An American Life

An American Life

An autobiography written by Jimmy Gentry can be ordered through:
Jimmy Gentry
1970 New Highway 96 West
Franklin, TN 37064

An American Adventure: The Living Legacy of Jimmy Gentry

An American Adventure: The Living Legacy of Jimmy Gentry

The documentary film about the life of Jimmy Gentry can be ordered online at franklinsprings.com.

 

 

History of Gentry's Farm

The Gentry Farm has been owned by Rebecca Gentry's family for over 150 years.

Samuel Fielding Glass began buying land in Williamson County in 1849.  In just a few years his farm spanned over 1000 acres. Early receipts tell us he was a farmer of cotton and raised dairy cows, as well as running a hat factory in Franklin. From the early 1900's the family lived in town and rented the farm and the main house to tenant farmers. The Gentrys moved back to the farm in 1975 and today three families live on the almost 400 acre farm.

 

Jimmy Gentry Home

Jimmy Gentry Home

The main brick house was begun by Samuel Fielding Glass, Jr. before the Civil War. An early receipt describes work done on the stone foundation for S. F. Glass for $79.50. The stone mason goes on to say  “we agree to return and complete his foundation for his house after the present political troubles have passed...” The receipt is dated April 24, 1861 just days after Fort Sumter was fired on. Other receipts lead us to believe the house was finished soon after the war. Bricks were laid in 1868 — doors, mantles, and blinds were ordered in September of 1868 (one wooden door 7’ by 3’3” for $8). Walls were plastered in March 1870 and wall paper was ordered at the same time (example: 64 rolls of marble paper for the hall cost $32.20). Carpet and curtains were bought in early 1870 (examples: 55 yards of Brussels carpet at $90.75). Several receipts for rooms full of furniture are dated 1870 (examples: 3 wardrobes, 2 dozen chairs, 3 bedsteads, 5 bureaus, 3 washstand, a looking glass for $120 and a marble top table for $20).

 

Alan Gentry Home

Allen Gentry Home

The frame portion of the home was moved in 1983 from a low-lying area of the farm. The early 1800’s dogtrot log structure was moved to the farm in 1986 from Goodlettsville. The numbered logs were cleaned and reconstructed adjacent to the frame house to make room for a growing family.

 

Scott Gentry Home

Early 1800's Log Cabin

This log cabin was renovated and added to by Scott Gentry in 1984. The original structure, built in the early 1800’s with a beautiful sandstone chimney, is the oldest building on the farm.